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BACK TO THE FUTURE - Then and Now ⭐ Real Name and Age

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Back to the Future Actors - Before and After | Real Name and Age
Back to the Future 1985 Cast:
01. Cristen Kauffman - Betty
02. Lisa Freeman - Babs
03. Norman Alden - Lou
04. Elsa Raven - Clocktower Lady
05. Harry Waters Jr. - Marvin Berry
06. Donald Fullilove - Goldie Wilson
07. Jason Hervey - Milton Baines
08. Maia Brewton - Sally Baines
09. George DiCenzo - Sam Baines
10. Frances Lee McCain - Stella Baines
11. Casey Siemaszko - 3-D
12. J.J. Cohen - Skinhead
13. Billy Zane - Match
14. James Tolkan - Mr. Strickland
15. Wendie Jo Sperber - Linda McFly
16. Marc McClure - Dave McFly
17. Claudia Wells - Jennifer Parker
18. Thomas F. Wilson - Biff Tannen
19. Crispin Glover - George McFly
20. Lea Thompson - Lorraine Baines
21. Christopher Lloyd - Dr. Emmett Brown
22. Michael J. Fox - Marty McFly

Back to the Future is a 1985 American science-fiction adventure comedy film directed by Robert Zemeckis and written by Zemeckis and Bob Gale. It stars Michael J. Fox as teenager Marty McFly, who is sent back in time to 1955, where he meets his future parents in high school and accidentally becomes his mother's romantic interest. Christopher Lloyd portrays the eccentric scientist Dr. Emmett "Doc" Brown, Marty's friend who helps him repair the damage to history by helping Marty cause his parents to fall in love. Marty and Doc must also find a way to return Marty to 1985.

Back to the Future was released on July 3, 1985, grossing over $381 million worldwide, becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985. It won the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, the Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film, and the Academy Award for Best Sound Effects Editing, as well as receiving three additional Academy Award nominations, five BAFTA nominations, and four Golden Globe nominations, including Best Motion Picture (Musical or Comedy). Ronald Reagan even quoted the film in his 1986 State of the Union Address. In 2007, the Library of Congress selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry, and in June 2008 the American Film Institute's special AFI's 10 Top 10 designated the film as the 10th-best film in the science fiction genre. The film marked the beginning of a franchise, with two sequels, Back to the Future Part II (1989) and Back to the Future Part III (1990), as well as an animated series, theme park ride, several video games and a forthcoming musical.

Song: Elektronomia - Sky High [NCS Release]
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Video Link: https://youtu.be/TW9d8vYrVFQ
Download Link: https://NCS.lnk.to/SkyHigh

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✪ THE MATRIX - Then and Now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bypt344cMRk&;index=2&list=PLisNxYKbqGALo91jk18l7su_PuqfTb3M3
✪ STARSHIP TROOPERS - Then and Now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IOwGgTtO1T4&;list=PLisNxYKbqGALo91jk18l7su_PuqfTb3M3&index=31
✪ PREDATOR - Then and Now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a...

 This site provides links to random videos hosted at YouTube, with the emphasis on random.


 The original idea for this site actually stemmed from another idea to provide a way of benchmarking the popularity of a video against the general population of YouTube videos. There are probably sites that do this by now, but there wasn’t when we started out. Anyway, in order to figure out how popular any one video is, you need a pretty large sample of videos to rank it against. The challenge is that the sample needs to be very random in order to properly rank a video and YouTube doesn’t appear to provide a way to obtain large numbers of random video IDs.

Alternative random YouTube videos generator: YouTuBeRandom

 Even if you search on YouTube for a random string, the set of results that will be returned will still be based on popularity, so if you’re using this approach to build up your sample, you’re already in trouble. It turns out there is a multitude of ways in which the YouTube search function makes it very difficult to retrieve truly random results.

 So how can we provide truly random links to YouTube videos? It turns out that the YouTube programming interface (API) provides additional functions that allow the discovery of videos which, with the right approach, are much more random. Using a number of tricks, combined some subtle manipulation of the space-time fabric, we have managed to create a process that yields something very close to 100% random links to YouTube videos.

 YouTube is an American video-sharing website headquartered in San Bruno, California. YouTube allows users to upload, view, rate, share, add to playlists, report, comment on videos, and subscribe to other users. It offers a wide variety of user-generated and corporate media videos. Available content includes video clips, TV show clips, music videos, short and documentary films, audio recordings, movie trailers, live streams, and other content such as video blogging, short original videos, and educational videos. Most content on YouTube is uploaded by individuals, but media corporations including CBS, the BBC, Vevo, and Hulu offer some of their material via YouTube as part of the YouTube partnership program. Unregistered users can only watch videos on the site, while registered users are permitted to upload an unlimited number of videos and add comments to videos. Videos deemed potentially inappropriate are available only to registered users affirming themselves to be at least 18 years old.

 YouTube and selected creators earn advertising revenue from Google AdSense, a program which targets ads according to site content and audience. The vast majority of its videos are free to view, but there are exceptions, including subscription-based premium channels, film rentals, as well as YouTube Music and YouTube Premium, subscription services respectively offering premium and ad-free music streaming, and ad-free access to all content, including exclusive content commissioned from notable personalities. As of February 2017, there were more than 400 hours of content uploaded to YouTube each minute, and one billion hours of content being watched on YouTube every day. As of August 2018, the website is ranked as the second-most popular site in the world, according to Alexa Internet, just behind Google. As of May 2019, more than 500 hours of video content are uploaded to YouTube every minute.

 YouTube has faced criticism over aspects of its operations, including its handling of copyrighted content contained within uploaded videos, its recommendation algorithms perpetuating videos that promote conspiracy theories and falsehoods, hosting videos ostensibly targeting children but containing violent and/or sexually suggestive content involving popular characters, videos of minors attracting pedophilic activities in their comment sections, and fluctuating policies on the types of content that is eligible to be monetized with advertising.
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